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By Dusty J. Cruise
Missouri Enterprise President and CEO

It would be disingenuous of us to say manufacturers have nothing to worry about. In the current climate with all the ups and downs happening across the country and across the globe, it’s hard to keep up and nearly impossible to find stability (unless you have a magic 8 ball that works). Despite the uncertainties and unknowns, the most recent numbers we have access to tell a different story or at the very least, provide a hopeful outlook.

By Dusty J. Cruise
Missouri Enterprise President and Chief Executive Officer

Amazon is making big news as it courts cities nationwide vying to be chosen for the company’s second headquarters.  As of the deadline in October of 2017, 238 cities submitted proposals for consideration, and Amazon projects it will announce its “short list” of candidates early this year.  Of course, that’s when the real negotiating will begin, with candidate communities offering incentives of all kinds, including tax breaks, infrastructure development and myriad other tempting tidbits to make them the most attractive choice for Amazon.  I read that one city even offered to change its name if that would do the trick.

By Dusty J. Cruise
Missouri Enterprise President and Chief Executive Officer

Perhaps better than anyone, business owners and CEOs understand risk.  They deal with risk every day as they manage their companies. Their decisions, choices and actions inevitably try to mitigate risk, or at least take a given risk into account before making decisions.

By Dusty J. Cruise
Missouri Enterprise President and Chief Executive Officer

Last month, after a comprehensive and robust vetting selection process, the U.S. Commerce Department’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) awarded organizations in 11 states and Puerto Rico, five-year funding agreements to support the Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP).

By Dusty J. Cruise, Missouri Enterprise

The term “global economy” often conjures up images of huge multinational corporations, with dozens of offices, moving shiploads of goods across countries and continents, electronically managing bills and collecting payments in a myriad of currencies, and of low labor costs and relatively minor regulation. These are things that seem to prevent small- and medium-sized American manufacturers from successfully competing with companies from distant places.